Putnam County Herald

KEY:

  • ". . ." - indicates that there is more to the obituary, but no genealogical information was provided.
  • "(XXX)" - indicates where the event happened.

Alred, Pete: Well we are sorry to read in this mornings Tennessean, the death of Pete Alred, who was injured by falling from a freight train. Mollie Dahuff [Date: 10/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 42, Page 4]

Anderson, Hu C.: Speaker of the State Senate, Hon. Hu C. Anderson died suddenly Monday night in Nashville and his remains were carried to Jackson, his home, for interment Wednesday. Both branches of the legislature attended the funeral in a body, going to Jackson in a special train. [Date: 3/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 9, Page 3]

Anderson, W. L.: W. L. Anderson - W. L. Anderson, about 70 years old, died at his home in Jackson county Saturday, after an illness of several months. Mr. Anderson was one of the most prominent citizens of that county, and was a brother of Jas. T. Anderson of Sparta, S. B. Anderson of Cookeville, B. C. Anderson of Gallatin and H. R. Anderson of Oneida. He leaves surviving him a widow and several grown children. [Date: 3/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 10, Page 1]

Bartlett, Fate: Fate Bartlett, one of the best known and most highly respected farmers in this section of the state, died at his home on Martin's Creek last Thursday. Mr. Bartlett leaves a wife and several children and numbers friends to mourn his loss. [Date: 6/24/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 25, Page 1]

Bean, Mabel: The death angel came into the home of Mr. and Mrs. Marlin Bean and claimed for its victim little Mabel. She was eleven months old and was a sweet baby, but she has gone to dwell in that mansion above. Grieve not, for God doeth all things well. She has gone from our midst; a voice to us is still; there is a vacant place which never can be filled. Minnie Bean, Cookeville, R 4 [Date: 10/7/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 40, Page 1]

Brewer, Mrs. W. R. -- Brotherton -- All this community was shocked on last Thursday morning to learn of the death of Mrs. W. R. Brewer. She died after a short illness of pneumonia fever, and was laid to rest Saturday in the Brotherton cemetery. She leaves a husband, six children and several brothers and sister to mourn her loss. Mrs. Brewer was 41 years old, a member of the M. E. Church, South, having joined when quite young and living a consistent member until death. She was ever ready to minister to those in need, and to know her was to be her friend. The community has lost a consistent Christian worker, the home a kind wife and fond mother. Where there is a vacant place in the home, and all made so sad and lonely, yet bereaved ones, though you will miss the gentle footsteps and tender voice of your loved one, remember she has gone to make heaven dearer to you. . . . [Date: 12/23/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 51, Page 1]

Brogdon, Darthula: The death angel has again visited our neighborhood and claimed for its victim, Mrs. Darthula Brogdon, the widow of James Brogdon, who departed this life Jan. 27. They were two loving old people and are badly missed in their home. They leave six children and a host of friends to mourn their loss. [Date: 9/16/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 37, Page 1]

Brown, Roscoe: Roscoe Brown of Bloomington attempted suicide Wednesday by shooting himself thru the body with a pistol. At last report he was not expected to recover. [Date: 5/27/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 21, Page 3]

Buck, Campbell: Mr. Campbell Buck, one of the oldest citizens of Algood died last Sunday and was buried Monday afternoon. The funeral was held from residence by Rev. Fount Smith. Interment was in the Algood cemetery. The deceased leaves a wife and several children. Mr. Buck had been a patient sufferer. He was a good citizen and a christian man. [Date: 1/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 4, Page 1]

Burkheart, Luther (Peaving, TN) - Luther Burkheart, son of Mr. and Mrs. Judd Burkhart, was killed while working in tan-bark woods last Tuesday, a tree blowing on him. He only lived a few minutes. Luther was a good boy and a member of the church. [Date: 5/13/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 19, Page 2]

Bush, Alice Frances: Alice Frances Bush - On Sept. 7, 1915, Alice Frances Bush aged 20 years, departed this life for the perfect life beyond. Her death though expected was a painful shock to the immediate family and numerous friends. The life of Miss Bushy was a beautiful example for others because of her purity, fidelity and consecration. Knowing that life was limited she accepted it complacently and seemed all the more firm in her love and trust in God. Her unbounded love for Jesus was manifested in the many pieces she composed, and in her kindness shown to fellow man. In her death the community has suffered a loss that is deeply felt. Her faith in God abiding love and christian fortitude proved helpful to all who came in contact with her. Tho her life ebbed at an early age, the memory of her gentle spirit will ever live in the hearts of those who knew her. Grady Hughes. [Date: 9/23/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 38, Page 1]

Bussell, Charles: Charles Bussell died at Havilland, Kansas, this morning after a brief illness with pneumonia. He left this section about three weeks ago, and after a visit with his brother Sam in Illinois went to Kansas. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Preston Bussell, of Route 2, and this was his first trip away from home any distance. He was about 26 years of age and a member of the Odd Fellows lodge in Cookeville. The remains will be brought home for burial. [Date: 4/8/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 14, Page 5]

Bussell, Charles: We, your committee appointed to draft resolutions relative to the death of Brother Charles Bussell, a loyal and highly esteemed member of this lodge, left his home in this county for the purpose of locating in the state of Kansas. About one week after his arrival in Haviland, Kas. He was stricken with pneumonia and died on Thursday, April 8, 1915. His remains arrived in Cookeville on Monday following his death and were interred at the West grave yard on last Tuesday afternoon. The funeral service was conducted under the auspices of this lodge. Therefore be it resolved, by the members of the lodge. (1) That we are deeply grieved over the death of this worthy young man and loyal Odd Fellow, who has, in the dawn of his vigorous manhood been called to that bourne from which no traveler has returned, but we are glad that he left behind him a good name and a manly life, which heritage we, his surviving brethren, shall ever treasure. . . . [Date: 4/22/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 16, Page 1]

Bussell, Charlie: Our community was grieved and shocked Thursday morning by the news that Charlie Bussell was dead. When the aged suddenly die it is only tired nature taking its root, but when those young and happy leave us to suddenly it is then the heart is most shocked. Charlie was sick but a short time, being taken sick on Wednesday and died next Thursday morning at 9 o'clock in Havilland, Kansas. Charlie was a boy of lovely face and disposition and ready with a smile and kind words for all. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Preston Bussell, and leaves father, mother, two brothers, two sisters and a host of friends to mourn his loss. . . . [Date: 4/15/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 15, Page 1]

Butler, Elizabeth Frances: MOTHER'S GONE - Elizabeth Frances Butler was born May the 12th, 1849, departed this life March the 15th, 1915 in her 66th year, after a brief illness of only a few days; but died very sudden, death being due to immediate heart failure. She was married to Wm. Ely Richardson in March 1875, and to this union and companionship of 40 years was born three children, one girl and two boys all of whom survive her, and together with their families, their father, her sister and a large number of relatives and friends to mourn her departure, yet we realize our loss is her gain. She lived a devoted christian from early girlhood, being a member of the Baptist Church, and the kind admonition that it was her nature to give shall always be remembered by me, and considered one of the greatest treasures of my life. The funeral was held at the home of Rev. F. S. Ditto in the presence of a large crowd, although the weather was end very disagreeable. . . . R. L. Richardson [Date: 4/15/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 15, Page 2]

Byers, Della: Mrs. Della Byers, whose residence was near Jeremiah, died Monday at one o'clock after a lingering illness and was buried at Paron Tuesday at 3:00pm. Mrs. Byers was a good woman and fond mother, and was well known in her neighborhood as a woman of sterling qualities. The funeral services were held by Revs. Simon Ensor of Rome, Tenn., and F. B. Cox of Algood. [Date: 2/18/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 7, Page 1]

Carpenter, Lucy (Hubert, MO) - Aunt Lucy Carpenter died April 6th, and left a husband to mourn her death. Aunt Lucy was 84 years old. We will all miss her very much. She was a member of the M. E. Church. [Date: 5/27/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 21, Page 1]

Caruthers, Jonas: Jonas Caruthers died at his home just east of town, on Monday, after a lingering illness. He was buried at Salem Tuesday, Rev. J. F. Tinnon conducting the funeral. Mr. Caruthers was born in and lived his whole life in Cookeville. He was an industrious man, a quiet fellow who attended strictly to his own business and withal a good citizen. [Date: 6/24/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 25, Page 3]

Clark, Wife of Walter: The death angel visited the home of Walter Clark and took away his wife and left her husband and little boy to mourn her death. [Date: 12/23/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 51, Page 3]

Cleghorn, Dick: A bad accident happened in this community when Dick Cleghorn was killed by his son with a hoe last Sunday. He leaves a wife and several grown children and a host of friends to mourn his loss. [Date: 6/17/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 24, Page 1]

Cleghorn, Richard: Richard Cleghorn Killed by His Son - Richard Cleghorn, and aged and highly respected farmer living several miles southeast of this city, was killed Sunday evening at his home by his grown son, Ike Cleghorn. The particulars of the patricide, as reported here, the tragedy is one of the most shocking in the history of this county. It is said that the aged wife of the dead man was urging their son to desist from certain immoral conduct whereupon the son began to abuse his mother, when the young man's father ordered him to refrain from abusing her. At this remonstrance from the old man the son turned upon his father and grabbing a hoe struck him upon the head with it. The blow crushed the old man's skull and he lingered in an unconscious condition until Monday morning when he died. Richard Cleghorn was about 66 years old. Ike Cleghorn is about 26 years old, and is a married man. He and his wife lived with his parents. After he had assaulted his father Sunday evening he left home, and officers started out in pursuit of him after one of his brothers had sworn out a warrant charging him with the murder. He was arrested by Deputy Sheriff Zack Dixson, Monday night and brought to Cookeville and placed in jail. The deceased was a brother of I. N. Cleghorn of the Rock City Spoke Company of Nashville. Their father Wyatt Cleghorn, was a pioneer citizen of this county and one of its best known citizens during his lifetime. [Date: 6/10/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 23, Page 1]

Clinton, Oval: We were real sad to learn of the death of our cousin, Oval Clinton, who lives at Calhoun, Mo. We learned that he was at a ball game on Sunday and died on the operating table of appendicitis Tuesday. [Date: 9/9/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 36, Page 1]

Clouse, Baby of Haston (Pleasant Ridge) - Haston Clouse's baby was shot the other day by his little boy, with a pistol. The baby died yesterday. [Date: 10/07/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 40, Page 1]

Clouse, Hallie: Mrs. Hallie Clouse died Friday night and was buried at Board Valley Sat. [Date: 3/18/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 11, Page 4]

Cole, Joseph (Gamaliel, KY) - The Death Angel visited the home of N. Y. Cole and claimed for its victim, Joseph, his little four year old son, and also the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Mosby and claimed their only little baby. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 3]

Coleman, Mrs. W. C.: Mrs. W. C. Coleman of Baxter died at her home last Friday night, but have failed to get any particulars. [Date: 8/19/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 34, Page 3]

Crosby, Fannie: Fannie Crosby - (Mrs. Frances Jan Van Alstyme) Every school and every Sunday school in our county and state should hold memorial service for Fannie Crosby, the wonderful blind song writer, who died recently at the age of ninety five years. She was a gifted poet and prolific song writer, and her poetry and songs were all an expression of her religion -- her great faith in God and his never falling in love. She was born in New York in 1820, and became blind at the age of six weeks, caused by unskillful treatment of the eyes. She was educated at the institution for the blind in New York city. She wrote six thousand hymns, according to the Standard Encyclopedia, many of which were published under other names than her own, as her publishers thought the public might object to their hymn books being filled with songs from one writer. This seems such a pity, as the world will never know, perhaps, quite all her writings. The best known of her hymns are: Blessed Assurance, Safe in the Arms of Jesus, Jesus Keep Me Near the Cross, Jesus the Waters of Life will Give, and I Shall Know him, or My Saviour First of All. She was intensely devout, and her spiritual faith made her have a vision beyond our mortal eyes into the recline of the infinite of God's love and mercy. She believed that her life was of more benefit to the world through blindness than if she could have had her sight: therefore she considered her affliction a blessing. No doubt the mind of the blind being kept in an inner sanctuary, unmarried and untroubled by the scenes of the this world, is more capable of keener vision into the spiritual world, and can therefore sing with greater faith and sweetness. . . . [Date: 2/25/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 8, Page 1]

Dow, D. L.: D. L. Dow Dead - David L. Dow died last night (Thursday) at 8:45 at his home in West Cookeville, after a lingering illness of a few months. He was in his 85th year, and until recently enjoyed good health. The funeral will be held at the Methodist church this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. J. F. Tinnon to conduct the services. Burial will be at the City cemetery, the Masonic fraternity conduction the services. The following have been named as pall bearers: F. R. Pendergrass, H. S. Hargis, W. B. Smith, O. K. Holladay, D. H. Morgan, F. E. Collier. Honorary Pall Bearers: C. J. Davis, S. B. Anderson, W. R. Staley, W. N. Gentry, A. Algood, S. B. Yeargan, Dr. L. D. J.

Dow, David L.: Resolutions of Respect - Death having once more eluded the vigilance of our faithful Tyler and entered within the sacred portals of our Lodge, another soul has been launched into eternity another brother has been called home. On the 12th day of august 1915, at his home in Cookeville, Tennessee, David L. Dow our beloved brother answered the summons to high fields of labor. His sincerity of purpose, kindness of mind and heart, and purity of life endeared him to all who knew him. Brotherly love, relief, truth, faith, hope and charity were practiced by him in his daily life among his fellows. His is gone from among us, and yet let us hope that his spirit will visit the confines of our Lodge and spur us on to greater proficiency, and as a tribute to his memory we, your committee, present the following resolutions: Resolved, That in the death of David L. Dow our fraternity has lost an intelligent and earnest supporter, our country an enterprising citizen and his family an affectionate father. Resolved. That the members of this Lodge wear the usual badge of mourning and that a page of the record book be set apart to perpetuate the memory of our esteemed brother. Resolved further, That we tender the sorrowing children our heartfelt sympathy in this, their greatest affliction, and that a copy of these resolutions be furnished to the family as a reminder of our love and affection, and copy be furnished the local papers. C. J. Davis, J. F. Dyer, J. R. Douglass, Committee, [Date: 9/16/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 37, Page 1]

Dow, David L.: Resolutions of Respect - To the Sunday School of the M. E. Church, South, at Cookeville, Tennessee: -- We your committee appointed to draft Resolutions of Respect to the memory of our late brother, David L. Dow, submit the following: Whereas, it has pleased our heavenly Father to call from his fields of labor, our Sunday School and church militant, our worthy brother, David L. Dow, and gave him a happy admittance to the Church Triumphant beyond the river of death, where he is enjoying the blessings of heaven. We, therefore, bow with humble submission to the will of our God and commend to his children the God of their father. Uncle Davy Dow, as he was called, was born in Clinton county, Ill., on the 19th of November 1830, and departed this life on the 12th of August 1915, aged 84 years, 8 months and 23 days. He made a profession of religion and joined the Methodist church when young. He was a good christian man. That is high praise for anyone. He was a man of more than ordinary ability: his memory was remarkable. While young he memorized a great deal of the Bible, and in old age it proved a great blessing to him and especially the Sunday school class of which he was a member. His remarkable memory and familiarity with the Bible enabled him to repeat from memory, accurately, a great many of the most precious verses of the Bible. He was one of the pillars of our church, supporting it liberally with his means, faithful in his attendance at Sunday school and church. He was always active and zealous in his christian labors, ever ready to care for the needy and distressed, and in conversation, conduct, life and character, a living witness and example to all end of the saving grace and power of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. He was a good father and reared an honorable family. He was a good citizen, a faithful member of our church and Sunday school -- a good christian gentleman. He has departed this life, but his example and testimony are still with us as a priceless legacy. God knew what was best for him and us, implicitly relying on His precious promises, we know that all is well with our dear brother, and that he is now among the redeemed. Therefore, Be It Resolved, that in his death the Sunday school and church have sustained a very great loss, and that we tender our heartfelt sympathy to the family and relatives of our deceased brother in this, their sad affliction. Be It Further Resolved, That this report be spread on the minutes for this Sunday school as our testimony of respect, and that a copy be sent the family of the deceased, also that a copy be furnished in Midland Methodist and local papers for publication. Respectfully submitted, D. E. Slagle, A. Algood, L. D. J. Ensor, Committee on Resolutions. [Date: 9/2/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 35, Page 1]

Dow, David Linnaeus: David Linnaeus Dow -- David Linnaeus Dow was born at Carlyle, Clinton County, Illinois, Nov. 19, 1830; married Emily M. Harris, Dec. 28, 1848; died Aug. 12, 1915. Mr. Dow moved to Putnam in 1854, where he resided until his death with the exception of the three years from 1863 to 1866, during which time he lived at New Middleton. He was a contractor and builder, and also a mill man for many years. Among the public buildings he erected in whole or in part were the first courthouse in Cookeville after the Civil war; the present courthouse at Livingston in 1871; at Celina in 1873, and the old courthouse in Gainesboro in 1874. He build and owned the first flour mill in Cookeville in 1875, and afterwards engaged in the lumber business. Mr. Dow was elect4ed to the lower house of the Tennessee legislature and served in 1883 under the first administration of Gov. W. B. Bate, begin the first direct representative from Putnam county. His wife died July 27, 1907, aged 81 years. They reared a family of nine children, all of whom lived to be grown and married, five of whom survive hi: Mrs. R. P. Baker, of Sparta; Mrs. G. W. Cowan, of Cookeville; John B. Dow, postmaster and D. W. Dow, of Mesquite, Texas. Mr. Dow was a well informed man on almost all subjects, having been a close student all his life until the past three years, when his eyesight became impaired so he could not read. He was a devoted member of the Methodist church for more than 60 years, always attentive to church and Sunday school, contributing liberally to both. He was a Master Mason Royal Arch and Knight Templar. [Date: 9/16/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 37, Page 1]

Ellis, Roy: Roy Ellis died at the St. Francis Hospital at Wichita last Sunday and was brought to Pratt for burial Tuesday afternoon. [Date: 6/24/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 25, Page 1]

Ensor, Dr. J. B. S. Martin We will publish a review of Mr. Dow's life next week. [Date: 8/12/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 33, Page 3]

Essex, Robert: (Manhattan, Mont.) Robert Essex was killed on the morning of Feb. 20, 1915 at Bolgrade, Mont., being hit by a Northern Pacific passenger train. He was badly mangled and never regained consciousness. The funeral was held at Boseman, a large crowd being present. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 2]

Farr, Child of Mr. and Mrs. Chas.: The four months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Farr died Sunday morning. The funeral was conducted Monday at their home on West Main Street, by Dr. A. J. Coile. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 5]

Ferrell, Pearl: Miss Pearl Ferrell - Miss Pearl Ferrell died at her home in Nashville, Tuesday, Feb. 23, 1915, aged about 28 years. She had been in poor health for several months. Miss Pearl lived in Cookeville several years and was a teacher in the public school for a number of terms. She was brought here for burial Wednesday afternoon, the funeral being largely attended. Many beautiful floral tributes were offered. [Date: 2/25/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 8, Page 5]

Fitzpatrick, Mrs. S. N.: Mrs. S. N. Fitzpatrick - Mrs. Bettie Fitzpatrick, wife of Elder S. N. Fitzpatrick, of Lebanon, died at a sanitarium in Nashville last Thursday and her remains were taken to Lebanon where the funeral was held at the Baptist church Friday by Rev. Chas. F. Alexander. Mrs. Fitzpatrick lived in Cookeville about two years and be her gentleness, kindness and Christian life, and had won many friends here who mourn her death. She is survived by her husband and several children. [Date: 2/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 6, Page 3]

Fox, Uriah H. W.: Memory - Uriah H. W. Fox was born in Jackson county, Tennessee, Feb. 27, 1834, lived with his parents, Anderson and Marion Fox, until he was twenty-one years of age, when he was married to Sarah Ann Brown, They settled on a farm and tilled the soil as a means by which to the necessities of life in their efforts they were united and things went well for awhile. They had been reasonably prosperous; three children had been born in their home; they had drank of the cup of satisfaction that is in a peaceful married life until most seven years had passed when the bitter draught came in the death of his wife, March 18, 1862. In 1863 -- Feb. 2. -- he was married to Dicie L. Whitefield. At this time, our county was waging a Civil war in which he was a soldier on the confederate side. They could hope to prosper but little while our country was shrouded in the gloom of war, not withstanding there was love in each heart, ??? for the other and a prayer on the lip of each that our country might be at peace and that prosperity might abound. Peace finally came and they soon settled on a farm facing the ruins of our southland caused by four years cruel war and worked diligently to build up the country, to make friends, and to gain a comfortable living to which end they reached. Aside from this twelve children was born in their home of whom seven are living as follows: Mary Chaffin, wife of Henry Chaffin, Wesley Fox, of Madill, Okla., Cora Loftis, Texola, Okla., Lenoard Fox, Oklahoma City, Okla., Cynthia Whitson, wife of Leonard Whitson, and Bee Fox, Cookeville, Tenn., and Vona Chaffin, wife of Columbus Chaffin, Gainesboro, Tenn., Route 3. On Dec., 24, 1904 his second wife departed this life. He remained single until death which came April 29, 1915, after a brief illness of pneumonia, on above dat4 he quietly passed away in the presence of Sidney C. Fox, only son living by his first wife a number of his other children formerly mentioned and a number of other friends. Such preparations were made as were necessary and his remains were quietly laid to rest in the family cemetery on the following day in the presence of a large gathering of relatives and friends, after an appropriate service led by John W. Fox. Death always brings sorrow but we sorrow not as those who have no hope. Our beloved and departed obeyed the Gospel of Christ about 52 years ago and we trust was loyal to the sacred cause until death. This being true eternal life will be his to enjoy forever and a crown will be his to wear that is set with jewels rare. May the Lord bless us all in accepting Christ on the terms of the Gospel, and living devoted lives to his sacred cause that we too might inherit a beautiful mansion prepared by our Saviour. -- John W. Fox [Date: 7/8/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 27, Page 3]

Gabbert, Mary: Tribute to Miss Mary Gabbert - At the home of her niece, Mrs. Luke P. Gillem, Miss Mary Gabbert died Monday morning after an illness of a few short days of grippe. Services were held over her remains Tuesday morning at the Christian Church, conducted by J. W. Richardson, after which her remains were laid to rest in the Cookeville cemetery by the side of her sister, Miss Leah Gabbert. Miss Mary Gabbert was the last of a family who for many years were well known in this section of the country. Her parents were both practicing physicians, and after "Granny" Gabbert's death in 1894, Miss Mary and Miss Leah lived in the home on Washington Avenue, and a more popular home was never known. Old and young gathered there; the high and lowly were welcomed alike. It was the social center of the town, but after Miss Leah's death, there were many changes and the old home was never the same. Friends prevailed on Miss Mary to rent out the house and go live with her niece, Mrs. Gillem, where she had lived two years, coming to town occasionally for a short visit to old friends, but returning with pleasant anticipation to the caresses of her little grand-niece, Tommie Lee Gillem, who baby laughter was the sweetest of all music to "Aunt Mary," for Miss Mary loved children and always had in her home some boy or girl attending school, ready with sympathy and understanding for them. It was most filling that no set funeral sermon should be said over the bier of Miss Mary Gabbert, but that those who known her longest and best should tell of her life -- it was most fitting that intimate friends should gather in little groups at the church while waiting for her remains and speak in subdued tones of the days when Miss Mary and Miss Leah were alive; should relate little incidents that told of the wonderful fortitude of these two women, and what they once meant to the town. Loving tributes were paid to them, the flowers of love and kindness scattered to their memory and the memory of the days when they two walked with us. J. W. Richardson, Jere Whitson, Thos. Finley and Dr. Dyer spoke most feelingly of the simplicity of Miss Mary's life, a life that all would do well to emulate in its virtue, its cheerfulness, its kindness, its fortitude, a life that daily exemplified her Christ. She was not possessed of his world's goods, but her unwavering faith in God, her belief and assurance of the material answer to prayer were worth more than the richest of coronets, while her loyalty to her friends, one of her strongest characteristics, blessed her manifold. Her grave will be kept green for many years by sorrow's tears, and love and honor will sentinel the hallowed spot where sleep Miss Mary and Miss Leah in their long last sleep. Mrs. Rutledge Smith. [Date: 1/14/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 2, Page 5]

Garrison, Dank: At a regular meeting of Mount View Lodge, No. 179, on July 31, 1915, the undersigned committee was appointed to draft resolutions on the death of its member and our brother, Dank Garrison; also on the wife of brother John Payne. Whereas, it has pleased the Supreme Architect of the universe to remove from our midst our late brother, Dank Garrison; and Whereas, the intimate relations long held by our deceased brother with the members of this lodge render it proper that we should place on record on appreciation of his services as an Odd Fellow, and his merits as a man; therefore, be it Resolved, by Mt. View Lodge No. 179, that while we bow with humble submission to the will of the Most High, we do not the less mourn for our brother, who has been called from his labor to rest. Resolved, that in the death of Dank Garrison, this lodge loses a brother who was always active and zealous in his work as an Odd Fellow, ever ready to succor the needy and distressed of the fraternity; prompt to advance the interest of the order; devoted to this wolfare (sic) and prosperity; one who was wise in counsel and fearless in action; and honest and upright man, whose virtues endeared him not only to his brethren of the order, but to all his fellow-citizens. Resolved, that this lodge tender its heartfelt sympathy to the family and relatives of our deceased brother in this, their sad affliction. Resolved, that these resolutions be entered upon the minutes of the lodge and that a copy be sent to the family of our deceased brother. Ragland, Howard: Two men are dead as the result of a fight that occurred in the 12 the civil district of Jackson county last Sunday night. Howard Ragland, aged about 50 years and Taylor Stout, aged about 25 years were the victims. Mr. Ragland died soon after the fray, while Mr. Stout lived until Tuesday. Both of these men were married and leave families. It is stated that these families had been at outs for some time, but the immediate cause of this fatal encounter is not known. [Date: 8/5/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 31, Page 1]

Garrison, Dank: Bro. Dank Garrison died about 5 a.m on the 18th inst., and was buried at the Pippin graveyard on the 19th inst. thirty or more brothers participating, a concourse of 350 to 500 friends being present. Warrant for burial was ordered drawn on treasurer, likewise the usual assessment is charged. [Date: 7/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 30, Page 1]

Glover, Mrs. R. L. (Chestnut Mound, TN) - This vicinity was made sad last Friday night when the death angel came down from Heaven and claimed for its victim the soul of Mrs. R. L. Glover, and carried it from this low ground of sin and sorrow to that Celestial City on high, where she is now basking in the sunlight of His holy presence on that everlasting shore. Mrs. Glover was about 37 years old and had been closely identified with the Missionary Baptist church for a number of years. If the value of a woman can be estimated by the love of her friends, there is no way of filling her place. She was loved by all who knew her. In the death of Sister Glover the community and church as sustained an irreparable loss. We are grieved that it was God's will to remove her from us, but we thank Him for her life and realize that our loss is her is eternal gain. God gave her noble life to wield its influence for a few breif (sic) years, the this life was ended, proving a warning to those who have not made their calling and election sure. Sister Glover's friends were numerous, as was demonstrated by the long procession that followed her remains to the cemetery, where a large number had assembled to pay her their last tribute of respect. His Spirit smiles from that bright shore. And softly whispers. "Weep no more." Her remains were laid to rest Saturday afternoon in the New Macedonia cemetery in the presence of a large number of sorrowing friends and relatives, Bro. Lee Harris, officiating. Though there is an empty seat around the fireside a vacant chair at the table, . . . To her bereaved husband and daughter we would say, weep not, but be patient in the hope of meeting her again . . . Paul Fitzpatrick [Date: 9/30/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 39, Page 4]

Grey, Mr. (Utica, MO) - We had the misfortune of losing one of our friends yesterday. Mr. Grey died yesterday, leaving a wife and four small children to mourn his loss. [Date: 7/8/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 27, Page 2]

Hall, John: John Hall Killed - Last Saturday night John Hall was shot to death at the home of Nancy Herrin in the Eighth district of Putnam, near the DeKalb county line. It is reported that Hall was on his way to Baxter and Mrs. Herrin, his cousin, asked him to stay all night, which he agreed to. That about midnight Si Anderson and Ed Vickers came to the home and demanded admittance, threatening to break down the door. Upon the door being opened Anderson is said to have seized the woman and began beating her and Hall was shot as he tried to leave the house, dying almost instantly. It is alleged that Anderson had started to leave and came back when the shots were fired. Mrs. Herrin has sworn out a warrant for Vickers but he has fled or hid out and has not been arrested yet. Hall was about 22 years of age and a quiet and inoffensive young man. [Date: 9/30/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 39, Page 1]

Hall, Oldest Child of John: The death angel visited John Hall's Sunday night and took away his oldest child. [Date: 9/23/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 38, Page 1]

Hammon, Christina: Miss Christina Hammon died Jan. 18, aged 84 years. [Date: 2/25/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 8, Page 1]

Harris, O. D.: O. D. Harris died at his home about two miles west of this city today after a long illness. He was about 80 years of age and well known in this section. He had been blind for several years, losing both eyes by accident, one when a young man and the other some four years ago. Mr. Harris is survived by his faithful wife and several grown children. Cole, Joseph (Gamaliel, KY) - The Death Angel visited the home of N. Y. Cole and claimed for its victim, Joseph, his little four year old son, and also the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Mosby and claimed their only little baby. [Date: 4/8/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 14, Page 5]

High, Child of D. L.: The lodge deeply sympathizes with Bro. D. L. High, whose year old child died this evening, the 24th inst. [Date: 7/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 30, Page 1]

High, Harold: Harold, the 13 months old son of Dave High, died last Saturday night, after several days sickness. The funeral was conducted Sunday by Rev. E. A. Cate and the little body was laid to rest in the City Cemetery. [Date: 7/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 30, Page

High, Mrs. D. L.: Tribute to Mrs. D. L. High - Tho her body has succumbed to mortal pain, the beauty of her immortal soul still lives. Her life was not like the comet - only an instantaneous flash of brilliancy - but a pure, calm light that shed its rays on all around her. Thus when the light of her life burned out, the lose was manifold. By her death Cookeville has lost a useful citizen, the church an active member, the Missionary Society an energetic worker, the husband a loving wife and the children a devoted mother. Her extensive popularity was due to her friendliness and kindness to all. The heads bowed with grief, the eyes wet with tears and sorrowing faces of all who knew her, spoke eloquently of the love and esteem that she held. How cheap and yet how great it is to be kind. May we all profit by her example. -- Grady Hughes [Date: 3/25/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 12, Page 1]

High, Wife of D. L.: The usual assessment was ordered on the death of the wife of Bro. D. L. High. [Date: 7/8/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 27, Page 1]

High, Willie Conditt: Mrs. David L. High - Mrs. Willie Conditt High, wife of David L. High, died at their home in Cookeville March 17, 1915, after a lingering illness. At the age of ten she professed faith in Jesus and united with the Methodist Episcopal Church South at Elmwood, Smith County, Tenn. She was received into the Methodist Church at Cookeville, Jan. 24, 1909 by certificate. She leaves a husband and three children to mourn their earthly loss. After burial services in the Church, conducted by her pastor J. F. Tinnon, her remains were buried in the City Cemetery Thursday afternoon. [Date: 3/18/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 11, Page 1]

High, Willie Conditt: RESOLUTIONS - Whereas our dear Heavenly Father saw fit in his divine wisdom to remove from her home, her loved ones, and her church, to that home above, our sister, Mrs. Willie Conditt High, on March 17, 1915, we, members of the Woman's Missionary Society of the Methodist Church at Cookeville, hereby Resolve: 1. That we very keenly feel our loss. The removal of such a noble Christian character leaves a vacancy that can never be filled and a great loss not only to our church but to all who knew her. 2. That the loving faithful attendance and service which she rendered the Sunday School, Missionary Society and church be held in grateful remembrance. . . . [Date: 3/25/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 12, Page 1]

Hix, Mattie Marie: On January 15, 1915, the death angel visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Hix and claimed for its victim their loving daughter, Mattie Marie, age 15 years, 3 months and 33 days. She was ill only for a short time, and all that loving friends and physicians could do was done, but to no avail. She was very bright and loved by all who knew her. . . . [Date: 2/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 5, Page 4]

Holladay, Edna Smith: Edna Smith Holladay (1884-1915) The many friends of Edna Smith Holladay were shocked and grieved to learn of her sudden death at her home near Algood, March 4, 1915. She was ill only a few days, and was not thought to be in a dangerous condition until a few minutes before her death. . . . [Date: 3/18/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 11, Page 1]

Holladay, Edna: Mrs. L. D. Holladay - Mrs. Edna Holladay, wife of Latta D. Holladay, died suddenly Thursday afternoon at her home on Spring Creek following a congestive chill. She was apparently in good health until a few hours before her death, which came as a great shock to everyone. She was 31 years old and is survived by her husband and five small children. She was the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John O. Smith and was a noble Christian woman. Funeral services were conducted Friday afternoon at the Methodist church, of which she was a member. Burial was at the city cemetery. [Date: 3/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 10, Page 1]

Holman, James S.: James S. Holman - James S. Holman died suddenly Saturday, Oct. 30, at the home of his son, W. F. Holman five miles west of Cookeville. He was nearly 73 years of age, and leaves two sons and five daughters. Burial took place at the Stewart graveyard Sunday, Oct. 31. As to his good character and worthy esteem of his neighbors, the following resolutions will speak: RESOLUTIONS whereas is has pleased God to remove from the walks of life our dear brother, James S. Holman, whose death occurred at his son, W. F. Holman's, near Pleasant Valley church, five miles west of Cookeville, on Oct. 30, 1915. Therefore, be it resolved by Pleasant Valley Local No. 1234, F. B. & C. U of A. That in the death of Bro. Holman our local has lost a loyal and worthy member, his children an indulgent and loving father , the church a devoted member, his neighbors a thoughtful and unselfish friend. By the death of such man as Bro. Holman, the ties that bind us to the Heaven above are made stronger and may the good deeds and christian example that he has left behind ever inspire us to follow in the Master's footsteps, and ultimately attain that reward which our beloved brother has already realized. Be it further Received, That's page of the record be set apart to the memory of our dear brother. [Date: 11/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 45, Page 1]

Holman, James: James Holman died suddenly and was buried at the Stewart graveyard funeral services being held by Bro. Winfield Stone. [Date: 10/28/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 43, Page 1]

Holman, Silena: In the death of Mrs. Silena M. Holman, which occurred at Fayetteville last Saturday, Tennessee lost a noble woman and the State W. C. T. U., or which she was president, a very able and consecrated official. [Date: 9/23/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 38, Page 2]

Jackson, Baby Girl of W. S. Jackson: Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Vickers said they sent their whole sympathy to W. S. Jackson and family, through the death of their baby girl. May the Lord bless and be with you all. [Date: 3/18/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 11, Page 1]

Jackson, Emmie Elizabeth Judd: The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Judd, departed this life January 24, 1915, at the age of 34 years and one month. When God called her to that brighter home from whence she same, she a true type of Christian character, and belonged to the Baptist church; being reared by good Christian parents, she became obedient to her Master at a tender age and was a kind mother and devoted wife until death. She was always ready and willing to work in the Master's vineyard and to give encouragement by her pleasant smiles and willing ways. She was loved by all who knew here, both old and young alike, and is sadly missed in her church, but more so in this home, where she was so tenderly loved, but God loved her more. She was needed in her home but God called her to a better home. I will say to the heart-broken husband and children look up through your tears and remember that God doeth all things for the best, and try to live to that point, as she did, and some day you will meet her face to face in that beautiful land. Her's was the saddest death that had occurred in the family for a number of years. She leaves to mourn her loss, a husband, John Jackson, and five children, Clayton, Marvin, Harris, Valeda and Lucille, a baby of nine days old; father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Judd; three brothers, Belve, Henry and Early; two sisters, Mrs. Fannie Edwards and Beatrice Judd; besides a host of near relatives and friends. Emmie gone, but not forgotten. - Mrs. Verge Bullington [Date: 2/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 5, Page 4]

Jackson, Lyda Jewel: Lyda Jewel Jackson - In memory of our beloved little Lyda Jewel Jackson, who died Feb. 28th. She was 3 years ten months old. We miss her sweet little voice and the touch of her little hands. We are grieved because of her departure, for home is not what it was before she was takn (sic) way, but God took her away from a sinful world and he does all things best. Papa, Mama, two lititle (sic) Brothers and five sisters (W. S. Jackson) [Date: 3/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 10, Page 1]

Johnson, Child of Mr. and Mrs. W. H.: The five year old child of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Johnson died Friday night after a long illness. Cole, Joseph (Gamaliel, KY) - The Death Angel visited the home of N. Y. Cole and claimed for its victim, Joseph, his little four year old son, and also the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Mosby and claimed their only little baby. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 5]

Johnson, Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H.: The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Johnson, who has been sick for some time died Friday night and was buried in the Cookeville cemetery Saturday. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 2]

Johnson, Mrs. J. D.: Mrs. J. D. Johnson, died at her home in Byrdstown Tuesday night after an illness of several weeks with amebla dysentary. She was about 66 years of age. Mrs. Johnson was the mother of own townsman. Cole, Joseph (Gamaliel, KY) - The Death Angel visited the home of N. Y. Cole and claimed for its victim, Joseph, his little four year old son, and also the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Mosby and claimed their only little baby. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 5]

Johnson, W. S.: O. D. Massa represented the local camp of M. W. A. at the funeral of W. S. Johnston, at Nashville Sunday. Mr. Johnston died Saturday morning. He had been for a number of years the highest officer in Modern Woodcraft in the state having been State Deputy Head Consul, and was known by almost every member of the order in Tennessee. [Date: 10/07/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 40, Page 3]

Jones, B. L.: B. L. Jones - B. L. Jones, a well known business man of Silver Point died at his home last week, after a lingering illness with Bright's disease. He was 65 years old. He had been engaged in the mercantile business for forty years, and was a man of high integrity, who enjoyed the confidence and esteem of all who knew him. He is survived by his wife and several grown children. [Date: 3/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 9, Page 3]

Jones, Joseph: Joseph Jones died at his home in Monterey last Saturday and was buried at Baxter Sunday evening. [Date: 2/25/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 8, Page 5]

Jones, Matthew: Matthew Jones died Thursday in Double Springs at his home. He was a few weeks over 80 years of age, having been born Feb. 16, 1835 in Jackson county where, he lived until about 15 years ago, since when he had made his home at Double Springs. He is survived by his wife, who has suffered on the bed of affliction for many years and four children, B. C. Jones of this city; Albert Jones, in Alabama; Alvin, in Oklahoma; and Miss Nettie Jones, at Double Springs. Mr. Jones had been a faithful member of the Church of Christ for about 35 years. [Date: 3/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 10, Page 1]

Jones, Mrs. Matthew: Mrs. Matthew Jones died at her home in Double Springs last Saturday, at the advanced age of 86 years. She had been an invalid for about 15 years. Her remains were interred at Flynn's Lick. Cole, Joseph (Gamaliel, KY) - The Death Angel visited the home of N. Y. Cole and claimed for its victim, Joseph, his little four year old son, and also the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Mosby and claimed their only little baby. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 5]

Judd, John: John Judd - John Judd, 83 years of age, who died at the county farm Sept. 2, was laid to rest at the family burying ground at Judd Cemetery last Friday, the services begin conducted by Rev. J. E. Huffines. Deceased was a brother of Rev. M. Judd and N. J. Judd. The writer, who had known him from boyhood, was requested to put this notice in the paper. C. J. Davis [Date: 9/9/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 36, Page 5]

Kirby, Charles Burton: Chas. Kirby - Charles Burton Kirby died at his home in this city Saturday morning after a prolonged illness with tuberculosis. Burial took place Sunday morning at the Burnt Stand cemetery, Rev. J. F. Tinnon conducting the last said rites in the presence of a large concourse of friends. Mr. Kirby was only about 25 years of age and leaves a wife and three small children besides his mother and a brother. He was a member of the M. E. Church, South; he was honest and industrious and had the respect of all who knew him. Those left to mourn his departure have the sympathy of the entire community. [Date: 9/16/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 37, Page 1]

Kirby, Charles: A Faithful Husband - Dear neighbors and friends, I this sad, lonely evening I express my love to you all for the kindness and love you have shown toward us during the sickness and death of my precious husband, who had gone to the mansions that our blessed saviour had prepared for each of us, who does his blessed will. And may God bless each one of you and be with you all until death comes. It seems like it is more than I can bear to think that my companion is gone forever, but our Heavenly Father know best and I can only trust the Lord for help and comfort. Charlie was so good and looked like he tried to be as little trouble as possible, but looked like everybody wanted to do something to help him, and the rest of us. He didn't want for a thing, but what he got it. And I certainly do thank the neighbors and friends for their goodness and kindness. I will close with a heart full of love for each one of you. Your friend, Annie Kirby. [Date: 9/23/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 38, Page 1]

Kittrell, Fannie: Mrs. Fannie Kittrell -- On the 18th day of November 1915, the angel of death bore away the spirit of our dear friend and neighbor, Mrs. Fannie Kittrell. Sister Kittrell was indeed a good woman - kind and affectionate; a gentle, tender and loving mother; and a devote christian -- member of the M. E. Church South, where she will be missed both in church and Sunday school. She was ever ready to speak the kind word, lent the helping hand to the cause of Christ and a comforter to the sin-sick soul. She was load to rest in the Algood cemetery. Our hearts go out in deepest, sympathy for the children left behind, for some great thinker has truthfully said that there was not velvet so soft as a mother's lap; no rose so sweet as a mother's cheek; no music so charming as mother's voice. While Sister Kittrell suffered many long and weary weeks before she was called away let us all be comforted with the thought death has set her soul free to be above the sorrows and signs of this world, and to nestle in the bosom of the love of God and be with the angels while the eternal ages roll. . . . Martha L. Cooper [Date: 12/16/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 50, Page 9]

Kuykendall, William: Wm. Kuykendall, aged about 70 years died at his home two miles west of Cookeville, Tuesday night after a sickness of several months. The remains were buried in the Judd Cemetery Wednesday. Mr. Kuykendall leaves his wife and several children among who is Mrs. Sterling Wall. [Date: 8/12/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 33, Page 3]

Lee, Darmon: Darmon Lee, son of George Lee died July 5th, leaving a father, three brothers, one sister and a number of friends to mourn his loss. [Date: 7/15/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 27, Page 2]

Lee, Lean: A TRIBUTE OF LOVE - On Monday, Oct. 11, 1915, the death angel visited the home of Mr. Alex Lee and claimed for its victim his loving companion, Mrs. Lean Lee. She was a true christian woman and was loved by all who knew her. She leaves a husband, two sweet girls and a host of warm friends to mourn their loss. It is sad to part with once home we had learned to love so dearly. Words cannot express how we miss her, but we know she has gone to rest. Her spirit took its flight from this world to the mansions above that Jesus prepared for her, and all those who prove faithful. Lean was an excellent singer, having possessed a talent for singing which she well improved. None can fill her vacant seat It was in the church choir that I learned to love her. I have often thought she had the sweetest voice for music I ever heard, but her sweet voice will be heard with us no more here. I can only say to the bereaved and lonely ones, be faithful a few more years and you can meet your dearest one and many others who have gone on. This is a great consolation -- our loss is her great gain. . . . [Date: 11/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 45, Page 1]

Lee, Leeann: Rocky Point - The death Angel visited our community last Monday and claimed for its victim, Mrs. Leeann Lee. She leaves a husband, two children and a host of friends and relatives to mourn their loss. [Date: 11/04/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 44, Page 3]

Lee, Mrs. George: Mrs. George Lee died Aug. 13, 1915, after an illness of over two weeks. She leaves a father, mother and several brothers and sisters, a husband and three small children to mourn her death. [Date: 8/19/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 34, Page 1]

Massa, A. R.: Honorable A. R. Massa - Hon. A. R. Massa died Sunday morning at his home, four miles south west of this city. He was 73 years old and one of the best known and highly respected citizens of Putnam county. He had spent his entire life in this county, and his walk was always that of an upright Christian gentleman. From his childhood he was a devoted member of the Free Will Baptist church. He was also a Mason and an Odd Fellow. He served as a Representative from this county in the General Assembly of 1909 and 1911. His wife died several years ago, he is survived by three daughters. The remains were interred at the West Cemetery Sunday afternoon. [Date: 2/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 5, Page 3]

Massa, A. R.: In Memoriam -- Hon. A. R. Massa was born April 4, 1842, and died January 31, 1915. He lived in Putnam county all of his life. He was married to Elizabeth Burgess sometime before the Civil war, and they both joined the Free Will Baptist church of Cane Creek in 1864; to them were born six children all of whom were girls, three of them still living. Mrs. Erastus Davis, Mrs. W. H. Barr, and Mrs. Jesse Pendergrass; those who have died were Mrs. Paris Carr, Mrs. James Carr and one who died when about grown; the mother and wife died April 18, 1909, at the age of 75 years and three months. There are some things that can truthfully be said about Brother and Sister Massa and their children and surviving loved ones. There are 11 in the family and all of them are members of the church and are devoted Christians, so that ought to be some encouragement to parents to "Bring up your children in the way they should go, and when they get old they will not depart from it." These parents always set good examples before their children. Bro. Massa had been for a long time a Prohibitionist, and served Putnam county two terms in the lower house of the legislature; he served on some very important committees and he was one who helped destroy the liquor traffic in Tennessee; so you see it is not strange that he raised a good group of children. But few parents realize the great responsibility that rests on them; for the examples they set before their children; God give us such men -- Men whom the lust of office cannot kill, Men, whom the spoils of office cannot buy; Men who fear God and cannot lie. Bro. Massa was buried at the West cemetery Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. W. B. Gentry and Suttrell Clouse. -- W. L. Ray [Date: 2/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 5, Page 4]

McCluen, Bro. I. W.: Bro. I. W. McCluen was buried on the 16th, inst., with honors of the order. An order for warrant for burial benefits was made, also that the usual assessment be charged up. . . . RESOLUTIONS: Whereas, death has again invaded our ranks and taken from our midst another brother, we wish to pay tribute to his memory and express in some feeble manner the sense of our great loss; therefore, Resolved, that in the death of our worthy Brother I. W. McCluen, on Jan. 13, 1915, Mt. View Lodge, No. 179, I. O. O. F., has lost one of its most enthusiastic and efficient workers - a trusted and honored leader in every good work. He was universally loved and respected and the vacancy occasioned by his untimely departure will be hard indeed to fill. We extend sincere sympathy to the bereaved family. The foregoing will be published in the Cookeville newspaper and engrossed copy sent to his beloved wife, Mrs. I. W. McCluen. [Date: 1/28/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 4, Page 1]

McCluen, I. W.: I. W. McCluen died this morning at his home, two miles south of town. He was in apparently good health, although for several months has had more or less trouble with heart disease. He was a prominent member of the Odd Fellows and Masonic orders in which he took quite an active part. He leaves a wife and several children who mourn his decease, also a great host of friends throughout the state. Burial will take place Sunday, as some of his children count got get here sooner. [Date: 1/14/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 2, Page 5]

McCluen, I. W.: Whereas our dearly beloved brother, I. W. McCluen, departed this life on January 14, 1915 at his home near this city. Therefore, be it Resolved by Sylvan Rebekeh Lodge No. 58 I. O. O. F. of Cookeville, Tenn. (1) That the death of this good man and true Old Fellow is a source of inexpressible grief to all of his surviving sisters and brothers. His zeal for Odd Fellowship never waned. He loved all branches of the order. He was a devoted and loyal Rebekah, and in his efforts for the up building of this branch of Odd Fellowship his enthusiasm and activity was constant and untiring. As Captain of our degree team he rendered a great service to this lodge. (2) His loyalty and devotion to our order was an inspiration to us all, and the heritage of good works and noble deeds which he has left us will ever serve to inspire us on an upward to the achievement of better things. (3) To our faithful sister, the widow of our departed brother, and to each member of his family we extend our heartfelt sympathy. Our deceased brother measured up to the highest standard of a faithful and loving husband, a devoted and loving father, a consistent Christian gentlemen, and an Odd Fellow in spirit and in truth. (4) A page of our record will be dedicated to his memory and the secretary is directed to forward copies of the resolution to the widow of our deceased brother and to the local newspaper for publication. Eunie Davis, Alice Caruthers, Ernest H. Boyd, Committee [Date: 1/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 4, Page 1]

McCluen, Isaac W.: I. W. McCluen was born December 23, 1849 in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and died January 14th, 1915 two miles south of Cookeville. He has one brother and one sister now living; had three brothers gone to their reward before him. Mr. McCluen moved to Ohio, when he was 15 yrs old; left Ohio, moving to Tennessee in 1886, in Morgan county; from there to Cookeville where he has been living for 12 years. His wife, Mary McCluen died Oct. 16, 1909 and he was buried by her side in the Cookeville cemetery. No better Christians ever lived in Cookeville than Brother and Sister McCluen. She was a devoted Christian when they came to Cookeville, and he was converted about four years before he died. I was at the service when he was converted and we talked about religion many times after he was converted and he loved to talk on and about religion. He had never joined any church but his wife belonged to the Congregational church, and he said that he would join that church if there was any in this section as it was the church of his choice. His wife was sanctified and lived a wholly consecrated life full of love to all. There were nine children all of whom were present to see the father laid to rest, and the burial services concluded by Bro. J. F. Tinnon, pastor of the Methodist Church. The children were in different parts of the country, some in New York, some in California, but all got to Cookeville in time to be at the funeral of their father. They were a fine looking group of children, and their appearance showed that they had been raised by nice, clean parents. I do not know how many of them are Christians, but all ought to be. If they are not I hope that the scene they have just passed through will be a warning to all of them and that they will seek Jesus and accept him and be saved and ready to meet their parents in the sweet by and by. May the Lord bless the dear companion that is left lonely, and all of the rest is my prayer. -- W. L. Ray [Date: 1/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 3, Page 5]

McCormick, Eve: Death of Eve C. McCormick - The death angel visited our home July 8th, and took for its victim little Eve C. She was sweet and loving and how bad we hated to give her up for it had only been 10 months since we had given up Ova, our other sister who was the wife of Bennie Whiteaker. So little Eve C. had gone to meet her in that sweet home above. She was 12 years and 8 months and 22 days old. It is so hard to give them up, but God knows best. . . . The darling child had made peace with God. Little Eve C. was laid to rest in the Johnson church graveyard. Funeral services were conducted by Revs A. P. Welch and R. C. Rogers. Alice McCormick [Date: 8/5/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 31, Page 1]

McDaniel, Child of George: George McDaniel's little boy died last Wednesday and was buried at Smyrna cemetery. [Date: 3/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 9, Page 1]

Mills, Lena: The death angel visited the home of Curt Mills and claimed as its victim, Lena, who was thirteen years old. She has gone to rest. God does all things best. She was lovable and kind. [Date: 10/28/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 43, Page 2]

Mosby, Baby of Mr. and Mrs. Leon (Gamaliel, KY) - The Death Angel visited the home of N. Y. Cole and claimed for its victim, Joseph, his little four year old son, and also the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Mosby and claimed their only little baby. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 3]

Odum, Amanda: Miss Amanda Odum, who has been sick for quite awhile died at her home Sunday morning. She was laid to rest in the Judd cemetery. May God bless her mother, little sisters and brothers. May they all live so that when they leave this world they will meet their loved ones who have gone before. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 2]

Payne, Mary: Mrs. Mary Payne - Mrs. Mary Payne departed this life July 20th, 1915. She was 55 years and 7 months old. She leaves a husband and one son to mourn their loss. It is so sad to give mother up, but our loss is her gain. We would say to the bereaved ones, weep not as one who has no hope, for we know she has gone to rest. She was a good Christian woman and leaves her husband and a son who had marred and gone to his own home, which leaves the father alone. She had suffered for several years and we believe her death will give her soul and body rest. Her spirit took its flight from this world to that mansion that Jesus has prepared for her and all of his saints when they live out their days here in this world. Sister Payne was brought up from her girlhood to be a good girl. Her father and mother were devoted Christians and raised good children, most of them Christian men and women taking them altogether they are a good family of Christian people, belonging to the Methodist church for many years. We can only say to the lonely father to be faithful a few more years at most and you can meet your dear companion and mother and many others of your kindred and friends who have gone on before waiting and watching for you. . . Written by a Friend, W. L. Ray [Date: 8/5/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 31, Page 1]

Payne, Wife of J. B.: Since our last meeting our Bro. J. B. Payne's wife has died. [Date: 8/5/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 31, Page 1]

Payne, Wife of John: Whereas, God in his wisdom, has seen it proper to take from the home of our brother, John Payne, a member of Mt. View Lodge, No. 179, the loving companion and wife, and whereas, the true friendship in sympathizing with our brother, be placed on record, therefore, be it Resolved, that while we bow with humble submission to the of our creator (sic), yet we mourn with our brother whose home has lost a kind mother and loving wife. Resolved, further, that this lodge tenders its heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved brother in this said hour of distress. Resolved, that these resolutions be entered on the minutes of the lodge, and that a copy be sent to Brother Payne. Fraternally submitted by the Committee on Resolutions. [Date: 8/5/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 31, Page 1]

Pharris, Mary Jane: Mrs. Mary Jane Pharris died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Thos. Nicholas, one mile east of Cookeville last Sunday, Sept. 26, 1915, aged 85 years. She was the widow of the late John Pharris, and for many years a member of the Methodist church. Four grown children survive Mrs. Pharris. She was buried at Lovelady graveyard. [Date: 9/30/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 39, Page 5]

Phrasier, John A.: John A. Phrazier died at his home, one mile west of Cookeville on Monday, Aug. 2, 1915, after a long illness, and was buried at the Judd graveyard Tuesday. Mr. Phrazier was a gallant Confederate soldier, losing an arm at Murfreesboro. After the war he taught school for several years and was superintendent of schools for White county. Later moving to Putnam county he was elected circuit court clerk, serving from 1890 - 1894. He is survived by several grown children. [Date: 8/5/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 31, Page 3]

Pincus, Ike: Ike Pincus Suicides - Ike Pincus committed suicide at his home in Nashville on Tuesday afternoon by hanging. He had become despondent over the continued illness of his wife. Mr. Pincus was well-known in Cookeville where he resided for several years. He was a brother of Samuel Pincus. [Date: 7/22/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 28, Page 1]

Pippin, Simeon: Simeon Pippin died at his home in Jackson county, last Friday, Feb. 5, 1915, of illness incident to old age. He was about 85 years old, and one of the best known and most highly esteemed citizens in his section. He is survived by his wife and several children. [Date: 2/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 6, Page 3]

Pointer, Mrs. Mary: Mrs. Mary Pointer, wife of B. P. Pointer, died Tuesday at her home about three miles east of Cookeville, after a lingering illness. She was about 50 years old and was a noble Christian woman. She was a sister of Mrs. D. C. Wilhite of this city. [Date: 1/14/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 2, Page 2]

Ragland, Howard: Two men are dead as the result of a fight that occurred in the 12 the civil district of Jackson county last Sunday night. Howard Ragland, aged about 50 years and Taylor Stout, aged about 25 years were the victims. Mr. Ragland died soon after the fray, while Mr. Stout lived until Tuesday. Both of these men were married and leave families. It is stated that these families had been at outs for some time, but the immediate cause of this fatal encounter is not known. [Date: 4/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 17, Page 5]

Ragland, Mattie Holford: Mattie Holford Ragland, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Ragland, of this city, died Tuesday after a brief illness. She was about four years old, the baby and pet of a home bereaved. [Date: 12/2/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 48, Page 5]

Richards, Mrs.: Mrs. Richards of Baxter died last Monday and was buried Tuesday. [Date: 4/1/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 13, Page 4]

Sayles, Tabitha: Mrs. Tabitha Sayles, who is an aunt of Mrs. A. M. Gibbs, died several days ago at her home in Nashville. Mrs. Sayles paid a visit to Mrs. Gibbs every summer, and her visit was looked forward to with pleasure. [Date: 6/3/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 22, Page 3]

Sloan, Anderson: Anderson Sloan - Anderson Sloan died in Cookeville on Sunday. Sept. 12, 1915, after a long illness. The funeral was held on Monday at 2 o'clock in the Methodist church services being conducted by Pastor Tinnon. Masonic rites were held at the cemetery. Mr. Sloan was the oldest man in Putnam county, being nearly 97 years of age. He was born in North Carolina Oct. 19, 1819. While a young man he moved to East Tennessee, and came to Cookeville about the beginning of the Civil war, where he had since resided. He was for many years engaged in the mercantile business. Mr. Sloan was supposed to be the oldest Mason in the state, and took great interest in Masonry wok; especially that of the Order of Eastern Star. He was also probably the oldest church member in the state, having been a faithful follower of the Master and member of the Methodist church for 85 years. His church connection thus exceeded by several years the biblical three score years and ten. Such a long term of christian activity is given to but very few men. During the past few years Mr. Sloan was bind and could not get about much, but he was always cheerful. With the exception of sign he retained his faculties to the last. Anderson Sloan was an honest man -- the noblest work of God. He was a christian in the truest sense of the word. His life was an inspiration to those who knew him. A father in Israel has fallen asleep; another pure soul has taken its flight to realms of eternal bliss. May the memory of his sojourn among us remain while life is ours. Mr. Sloan leaves two sons, W. D. Sloan of Nashville, and Benj. F. Sloan of Cookeville, Route 6. His wife died many years ago. [Date: 9/16/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 37, Page 1]

Smith, Wiley: Uncle Wiley Smith died, leaving his son, Joe M. Smith, to heir his estate, He was a member of the Christian church. [Date: 10/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 42, Page 1]

Soper, Dwight B.: D. B. Soper - Dwight B. Soper, who several years ago, in company with D. R. Hulsart, established the veneer plant in Cookeville, and who has been connected with a basket factory in South Knoxville, died suddenly at the plant Monday afternoon from heart failure. His remains were taken to his old home in Michigan for Interment. The deceased was 51 years of age and is survived by three daughters, one of whom is Mrs. D. R. Hulsart, of Knoxville. Mr. Soper made many friends during his residence in Cookeville who are sad to learn of his sudden death. [Date: 5/20/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 20, Page 3]

Sorrell, Bascom: The remains of Bascom Sorrell, who was killed several days ago on a rail road, reached Sparta and were buried at the Ozion cemetery Monday. [Date: 4/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 17, Page 5]

Sparks, Mattie: Death of Miss Mattie Sparks - The death angel visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Sparks August 23, and took from them their 15 year old daughter. Mattie was a good girls and her death was a shock to all. She was sick only three days with throat trouble. She was converted just one week before her death under the preaching of Brother Charlie Smith at Pleasant Ridge and we truly believe that she has gone to that blessed home on high. Her remains were laid to rest at the Board Valley cemetery. Burial services were conducted by Brother Charlie Smith. We would say to the bereaved ones, weep not, for God knows what is best. "The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh; blessed be the name of the Lord." Written by a friend, Melissie Shirley. [Date: 8/19/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 34, Page 1]

Speakman, Frances: Mrs. Frances Speakman died last Friday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. M. Smoot. She was in her 89th year and leaves several children three of whom are residents of Cookeville, namely: Mrs. W. M. Smoot, Mrs. Nina Embrey and John Speakman. Her remains were buried Saturday in the City cemetery, Rev. J. F. Tinnon, conducting the funeral. [Date: 7/15/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 27, Page 5]

Staley, Will R.: Will R. Staley - The funeral of Will R. Staley was held at the Cumberland Presbyterian church last Friday at 2 o'clock and was largely attended. The services were conducted by Rev. J. R. Goodpasture. The flower offerings were large, the casket begin literally covered with beautiful flowers. Interment was made in the city cemetery. Will R. Staley was the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Staley, and had lived in Cookeville practically all his life, being 45 years old at the time of his death. He is survived by his mother and two brothers, I. D. Staley and A. A. Staley of this city. Mr. Staley enlisted in the First Tennessee Infantry at the opening of the Spanish war and went to the Philippines, where he saw hard service, being connected with the hospital corps. He returned to the United States with his regiment and was honorably discharged at San Francisco. Will Staley was a man of man fine qualities, and had hundred of strong friends, who grieve over his being called away in the prime of life. He was always willing to help the sick and those in distress, and will be greatly missed in the community. For the past several years he had been a member of the drug firm of Neal & Staley. [Date: 9/23/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 38, Page 1]

Staley, Will R.: Will R. Staley - Will R. Staley died at the home of his mother, Mrs. E. D. Staley, at 4:30 p. m. today, Aug. 16, 1915, after an illness of several weeks. Funeral services will be held at the Cumberland Presbyterian church at 2 o'clock tomorrow, Friday, conducted by Rev. Goodpasture. Interment at City cemetery. [Date: 9/16/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 37, Page 1]

Stanton, Lillian: Miss Lillian Stanton - Death came into the home of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Stanton near Gentry, Monday, July 12th, and took away their youngest daughter, Lilliam who was 17 years of age, and was loving and true to all. She was one of our school mates and it was said to give her up, but the Lord doeth all things best. She left her father, mother, four brothers and one sister besides many friends who mourn her death. We all hope to meet her. A friend. [Date: 7/15/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 28, Page 1]

Stanton, Lillian: Tribute to Lillian Stanton - She would not allow her mother see death's final clutch on her weary body. With a sad, sweet smile, she drifted into eternity, bravely facing the great unknown. To the last she was aware that life was limited, yet did not give up in despair. Instead wonderful strength of character was displayed by her determination to be cheerful and make those around her so, even tho' death was fast claiming her for his own. Lillian was a special favorite at home, at school or wherever she went. Her gentleness of spirit, affable manners and sunny smiles quickly won the hearts of all who knew her. How terrible it seems to her associates to be deprived of a mate so amiable so agreeable. How infinitely sad that the home is impaled with grief because of her absence. Yet how sweet is the assurance that they will meet her again to be parted no more. Again 'tis sweet to know that tho' she died in the bloom of youth, she has escaped the mocks and leers of this cold, merciless world. Her trials and sorrows are forever ended -- she has gone to rest in the arms of her Saviour. [Date: 7/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 30, Page 1]

Stanton, Simon Sidney: In Memoriam - On Sunday, July 11, the death angel visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Stanton and called home little Simon Sidney Stanton, their youngest son, aged bout two years. The little one had been sick only a few days and his going away was a surprise to all and a great shock to his parents. All the loving hands of father and mother, grandparents and two faithful nurses could do was of no avail. The Lord had planned otherwise and at about 11 o'clock Sunday morning, as the tolling bells were calling the congregations of the town to worship, the voice of our heavenly father called the spirit of little S. S. to come home and join the heavenly hosts in an everlasting worship, there to wait the coming of parents and little brother. The home s saddened and desolate because of his going away, but heaven is brighter and seems nearer to his loved ones because of his presence there. Funeral services were conducted at the Methodist church by Rev. J. F. Tinnon and Dr. A. J. Cole. The pall bearers were Misses Kate Stafford, Georgia Webb, Mildred Reagan and Elizabeth and Louise Yeargan, while Masters Herman Proffitt, Eugene Collier, Donald Ragland and James Carlen were flower bearers. The funeral services were the most beautiful ever held in Cookeville, after which the little boy was laid to rest in Cookeville cemetery there to walk the resurrection morn, when the bodies of the sleeping dead shall be assembled in the home above. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to Mr. and Mrs. Stanton in their bereavement. Friends. [Date: 7/15/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 27, Page 1]

Stephens, Father of Will (Peavine, TN) - The death Angel visited the home of Will Stephens Saturday May 1, and claimed for its victim, the dear father. Mr. Stephens had been ill for some time. He leaves a wife, three sons, and one daughter and a host of friends to mourn his loss. [Date: 5/13/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 19, Page 2]

Stout, Taylor: Two men are dead as the result of a fight that occurred in the 12 the civil district of Jackson county last Sunday night. Howard Ragland, aged about 50 years and Taylor Stout, aged about 25 years were the victims. Mr. Ragland died soon after the fray, while Mr. Stout lived until Tuesday. Both of these men were married and leave families. It is stated that these families had been at outs for some time, but the immediate cause of this fatal encounter is not known. [Date: 4/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 17, Page 5]

Stout, Wife and Children of Milton (Parkhill, Okla.) - The death angel visited the home of Milton Stout on May 1st, and took his beloved wife and two little babes. They were all buried in one coffin. Mrs. Stout was well known in Cookeville and was raised in Jackson county. I can say I never lived by a better neighbor. She was almost like a sist4er to me and I can say that she has paid the debt that we all have to pay. She leaves her husband and six children to mourn her death; also a father, two brothers and three sisters. Mrs. Ethel Shipley, you have my prayers and sympathy in this sad hour. Don't grieve, for your death mamma has gone to live with God. And I want to say to all Mrs. Stout's friends and relatives to live for heaven, for I think Emma will be at the gate waiting you there. [Date: 5/27/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 21, Page 2]

Tabors, Daughter of Bill: Memorial Services - Memorial services in honor of the daughter of Elder Bill Tabors will be held at Brotherton the fourth Sunday in May at 11 a. m., Elders J. P. Bilyeu and F. E. Elrod to conduct the services. [Date: 5/6/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 18, Page 1]

Terry, Carr: Mr. Carr Terry died suddenly at his home four miles north of town on Friday, Sept. 17, 1915. He was about to start for Cookeville and fell, expiring in a few minutes. [Date: 9/30/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 39, Page 5]

Terry, Celina: Mrs. Celina Terry - Mrs. Celina Terry, widow of Elijah Terry, one of the most highly esteemed women of this county, died Monday at the home of her son-in-law, R. L. Mitchell in Livingston. She was 90 years old and her faculties were wonderfully well preserved. She had been a resident of Putnam county for seventy years. Her maiden name was Celina Denton, and she was reared at Hilham. She was a member of the Christian Church. [Date: 1/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 4, Page 1]

Terry, Mrs. Talton: Mrs. Talton Terry died Feb. 19th, and was buried at the Cox graveyard and 20th. She leaves a husband and two children to mourn her loss, to whom we say, "Weep not, but try to meet her in the sweet bye and bye." [Date: 3/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 9, Page 1]

Thompson, Naomi: A DOUBLE FUNERAL - Naomi Thompson, wife of E. L. Thompson, and Lucracy M. Wells, wife of Byrd Wells, both died June 7, 1915. Sister Wells passed away at one p.m. and sister Thompson at seven p.m. Sunday. Their remains were carried to the Smellage cemetery June 8th and placed side by side in the altar under the tabernacle. The two coffins were nearly exactly alike. The funeral services were held by the writer, who was their pastor for a number of years, and who baptized sister Thompson more than 35 years age into the fellowship of Hopewell Baptist church Sister Wells and her husband were the two first to unite with this church after its organization. Both these women lived in the same neighborhood in the same church, all these year and there was but little difference in their age. Sister Wells was 75 years, 8 months and 25 days old. Sister Thompson was 75 years, 7 months and 20 day. It was indeed a very touching scene. After the funeral discourse the twin caskets were carried from under the bed, then both opened at the same time and the corpses were viewed by a large concourse of friends and relatives; then both were closed and carried to a newly made grave and laid away to rest until the Master called them hence. Both these women lived faithful consistent life until the end. Sister Thompson was the mother of five children, still live to mourn the loss of their best earthly friend. She also had 15 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. She was a kind and affectionate mother, a devoted wife, good, kind and attentive to the sick, but her labors in this world are at an end. She was sick for several weeks, but was true to the faith till the last, often expressed her great confidence in the Lord. She seemed not the least bit alarmed at the thought of death. Sister Wells had been bereft of her husband more than a year, and had been very feeble ever since. And her mind had become greatly impaired but she was strong in the faith of the old time religion till the last. She died at the home of her neice (sic), Mrs. T. M. Anderson near Silver Point. She had never had any children of her own but she and brother Wells had raised three orphan children, and now they rest from their labors and their works will follow them. J. M. Stewart Boma, Tenn. [Date: 7/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 30, Page 1]

Thompson, Sallie: I [Mrs. Rebecca Simmons - Scottsville, KY] to hear of the death of Mrs. Sallie Thompson. [Date: 5/6/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 18, Page 1]

Trapp, Daisy: The death angel visited the home of Dr. Trapp and claimed for its victim his little baby girl, Daisy. We hate to give her up but God knows best. [Date: 4/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 17, Page 5]

Verble, Lee: Lee Verble died suddenly of heart disease at his home in Orlando, Fla., May 21. He formerly lived at Monterey and moved to Florida about four years ago. He leaves a family and several brothers. [Date: 6/10/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 23, Page 5]

Wade, Amanda: Mrs. Amanda Wade died March 16, at the home of her son, Downey Wade, in Dallas, Texas. Mrs. Wade was 66 years of age and had been living in Dallas about six years, during which time she had made one visit here about three years ago. She was sick only a short while with pneumonia. The remains were shipped here and burial took place at the Bryne graveyard near Granville. Mrs. Wade leaves seven children who mourn her death. The children are Will C. Wade of Cookeville, Downey, Alvin, Alfred, Charles of Dallas, Texas, Mrs. Ova Byrne of Jackson county, and Mrs. Emma Spurlock of Nashville. [Date: 3/18/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 11, Page 1]

Wall, Baby of Wade: The death angel visited our community and claimed for its victim, Wade Wall's baby. [Date: 3/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 9, Page 1]

Waren, Della (Hubert, MO) - Mrs. Della Waren of Williamsville died May 16th, and left a husband and five children to mourn her loss. She was a member of the Christian Church. [Date: 5/27/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 21, Page 1]

Washer, Jewel Johnson: Jewel Johnson Washer - The death angel visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson Washer and claimed for its victim, little Jewel Johnson, aged four years and five days. The little darling had been sick only four days when the Lord called him to come up higher and rest. He was such a precious jewel in our home, we hated to part with him, put (sic) the Lord does all things well. He was such a good child during his sickness to take his medicine. He had the membranous croup. The little one was loved by everybody that knew him. It is so sad to give up our loved ones, but if we be faithful until death we can meet them where wenveer (sic) tell them good bye. When he knew that he was dying he wanted to come to us all for he seemed to love us all so good, the last word (sic) that he said was bye, bye mamma.: His sister -- Eliza Washer [Date: 10/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 42, Page 4]

Wassom, Pleasant M.: Pleasant M. Wassom was born April 5, 1841, died October 20, 1914. He professed religion and joined the M. E. Church South, when quite young, he was a consistent member of the church and loved its cause. All who knew him know he was a good and just man. Oct. 12, 1871, he was married to Miss Sarah M. Jaquess, and to this union seven children were born, all of whom are still living, and faithfully and lovingly ministered unto him in his last days. As a husband, no one was kinder; as a father, devoted to the welfare of his children. He enlisted in the war when a young man and marched forth to fight for his country, he served four years and in that time suffered the loss of a limb, so that he had to spend the remainder of his life on a crutch, he suffered intensely the last days of his life but bore it uncomplainingly and submissively. Though there is a vacant seat at the table and an empty chair round the hearth stone and the hole made so lonely and sad by the mysterious hand of Providence, yet the great Supreme Ride who holds us all in the hollow of his hands knows best. We would pray God's richest blessings on the widow in her declining years and on the children, who are pushing on to meeting him in a better world, where there are no good-byes spoken. Laura F. Kimes [Date: 2/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 5, Page 4]

Webb, Claudine: Little Claudine Webb, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bedford Webb of Crossville, died Tuesday and was brought down to Cookeville for burial. [Date: 11/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 45, Page 5]

Webb, John: John Webb of this place died at his home Sunday night, leaving a wife and several children to mourn his loss. [Date: 10/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 42, Page 1]

Welch, Alex: ALEX WELCH -- Squire Alex Welch died Tuesday at his home in the 5th Civil District of this county of pneumonia. He was 71 years old and had lived in Putnam County all his life. He had served 15 years as a member of County Court and was well known throughout the county. He served throughout the Civil War in the Confederate Army. He is survived by his wife and several grown children. He was a great-uncle of railroad commissioner Geo. N. Welch. [Date: 2/4/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 5, Page 3]

Welch, Byrom: In Memory of Byrom Welch - James Byrom Welch was born April 2, 1876, and died at his home three miles west of Cookeville on July 16, 1915. He was married August 26th, 1900, to Miss Amanda Taylor, daughter of our esteemed and well known citizen Henry Taylor. Byrom was a member of Christ's church, having obeyed the gospel several years ago under the preaching of Bro. J. D. Walling, and had lived a devoted life until death. It can truthfully be said that a good man, a good citizen, a good neighbor and a good husband has left us. Byrom Welch was a man whose friends could be numbered by the hundred, and if he had an enemy, the writer has no knowledge of it. The funeral service was held by Bro. J. H. Cummins, and the remains were laid to rest in the Cookeville cemetery, where the birds sing throughout the day and where the silent night kisses the flowers which bloom o'er his grave . . . Written by his friend and brother, Byrd C. Lindsey [Date: 8/19/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 34, Page 1]

Welch, Byron: Byron Welch, a successful farmer and highly respected citizen of this county, lied (sic) at his home, three miles west of this city, aft4r an illness of several months. He is survived by his wife, his father, James A. Welch and several grown brothers and sisters. He was a member of the Christian church. [Date: 7/22/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 28, Page 3]

Wells, Lucracy M.: A DOUBLE FUNERAL - Naomi Thompson, wife of E. L. Thompson, and Lucracy M. Wells, wife of Byrd Wells, both died June 7, 1915. Sister Wells passed away at one p.m. and sister Thompson at seven p.m. Sunday. Their remains were carried to the Smellage cemetery June 8th and placed side by side in the altar under the tabernacle. The two coffins were nearly exactly alike. The funeral services were held by the writer, who was their pastor for a number of years, and who baptized sister Thompson more than 35 years age into the fellowship of Hopewell Baptist church Sister Wells and her husband were the two first to unite with this church after its organization. Both these women lived in the same neighborhood in the same church, all these year and there was but little difference in their age. Sister Wells was 75 years, 8 months and 25 days old. Sister Thompson was 75 years, 7 months and 20 day. It was indeed a very touching scene. After the funeral discourse the twin caskets were carried from under the bed, then both opened at the same time and the corpses were viewed by a large concourse of friends and relatives; then both were closed and carried to a newly made grave and laid away to rest until the Master called them hence. Both these women lived faithful consistent life until the end. Sister Thompson was the mother of five children, still live to mourn the loss of their best earthly friend. She also had 15 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. She was a kind and affectionate mother, a devoted wife, good, kind and attentive to the sick, but her labors in this world are at an end. She was sick for several weeks, but was true to the faith till the last, often expressed her great confidence in the Lord. She seemed not the least bit alarmed at the thought of death. Sister Wells had been bereft of her husband more than a year, and had been very feeble ever since. And her mind had become greatly impaired but she was strong in the faith of the old time religion till the last. She died at the home of her neice (sic), Mrs. T. M. Anderson near Silver Point. She had never had any children of her own but she and brother Wells had raised three orphan children, and now they rest from their labors and their works will follow them. J. M. Stewart Boma, Tenn. [Date: 7/29/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 30, Page 1]

West, John: John West Killed - John West was shot Wednesday forenoon and died in a few minutes. Mr. West was on a raid with revenue officers, only three man being in the party, Mr. Tipton, Bill Gailbreath and West. They located a still near Roberts siding, between Boma and Silver Point, and were about to destroy the still when the shooting occurred. Tipton and Gailbreath left West after his death, and went to Silver Point to telephone for help. Several officers from Cookeville went down on the afternoon train and Mr. West's body was taken to Algood on the shopping train. Revenue agent Knox Booth also came up from Nashville with a posse of men and a thorough search and investigation will be made. One man, Geo Carr, has been arrested on suspicion of having had something to do with the shooting. John West was a good citizen and lived with his family between Cookeville and Algood. He is survived by his wife and several grown children. He was a brother of Joe West of this city. He was buried at the Phillips graveyard Thursday. This is the first time in many years that a revenue officer had been killed in this section, while on a raid, and there is considerable excitement over the event. [Date: 2/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 6, Page 3]

Wheat, Phil: We were sorry to hear of the death of Mr. Phil Wheat of Cookeville, who has suffered severely with paralysis for some time. We extend our sympathy to the bereaved ones. [Date: 3/25/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 12, Page 4]

Wheat, Phillip: Phillip Wheat - Phillip Wheat died Tuesday night at his home in West Cookeville, after an affliction of paralysis for several months. The funeral and burial took place Wednesday at Algood, the services being conducted by Rev. J. F. Tinnon of this city. Mr. Wheat came to this section about 24 years ago from New York and had lived in Putnam and Overton counties since. He was married twice, five children being born to the first union among whom are Phillip Wheat, Jr., of Livingston; John Wheat of Hilham; an Miss Hester Wheat, of New York. About seven (years ago he was married to Miss Amanda Phifer, who with her two little daughters survive him. Mr. Wheat was a well known and respected man, and a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Hilham. [Date: 3/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 10, Page 1]

Whiteaker, Son of Joe and Bell: The death angel visited Joe and Bell Whiteaker's home Sunday and claimed for its victim their 7 year old son. [Date: 3/11/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 10, Page 1]

Wilhite, Mrs. Reuben: Mrs. Reuben Wilhite - When the death of Mrs. Reuben Wilhite was announced it brought a feeling of sadness to everyone who had met and known this most estimable woman. Her soul was released from earthly care March 2, 1915. Since the death of her husband eight years ago, she had made her home with her only child Mr. Lewis Wilhite, a prosperous and well known farmer living near O'connor, in White county. Mrs. Wilhite was a daughter of Mr. Hop Barnes and a member of an old and honorable family. She had been in failing health for several months as a result of a stroke of paralysis, yet when confined to her room day after day, her gentle nature manifested itself in her remarkable patience. Never fretting nor complaining of her condition she passed her last days on earth peacefully. The end came silently as the falling snow, and the transition from life to death was marked by no trace of suffering. Throughout the many years of her useful life she was ever willing and ready to aid the sick and comfort those in distress. She has left to posterity the example of her deeds of kindness and mercy. Being a good son, and often said, he never spoke an unkind word to her. While we sympathize deeply with the son, who has lost his most precious friend, we feel the greatest sorrow for the only sister left behind, who has seen her father and mother, her only brother and now her last dear sister pass over the river of death into the great beyond. . . . During the past summer Mrs. Wilhite in company with her sister paid her last visit to the grave of her father When on taking their leave Mrs. Wilhite was assisted into the buggy by a friend, she remarked upon her failing strength and said it wouldn't be long till she would go home. . . . Stella Bohannon [Date: 4/15/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 15, Page 4]

Willmore, Twins: Willmore Twins Dead - Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Willmore are bereaved, and have the sympathy of the entire community, over the death of their two twin children, who were about ten months of age and were very bright and comely youngsters for their age. One died Sunday and the other one Tuesday. Bother were laid to rest in the City cemetery. [Date: 1/14/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 2, Page 5]

Wilmoth, Etta: Miss Etta Wilmoth was buried at Paran Tuesday at 11:00 o'clock. The deceased had been a patient sufferer for some time until death claimed her last Sunday at 4 o'clock at the home of her mother, three miles north of Algood. The funeral services were held be Revs. F. B. Cox and Jesse Gilliam in the presence of a large congregation. [Date: 1/21/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 4, Page 1]

Womack, B. R.: Death of B. R. Womack - After suffering for a number of months, having been partially paralyzed, B. R. Womack gave up the struggle about 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon at his home on College Avenue. The funeral was held at the residence and burial was made Monday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Services were conducted by Rev. Mr. West and Masonic rites were held at the grave. Mr. Womack is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Green surber, Mrs. Tom Newell, and Chase Womack. Mr. Womack had been a long time resident of Parker county. He was a member of the Baptist church. The Masons have appointed the following pallbearers to bear the body t the grave: J. R. Brown, C. S. Alexander, S. P. Newberry, J. M. Sparkis, Robert Barnhill, R. H. Henry. The above clipping from Weatherford, (Texas) Daily Herald was sent to us by D. S. Wright of that city. [Date: 2/25/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 8, Page 6]

Womack, William: William Womack died at the home of his son Haskell Womack, in this city, Thursday, April 15, 1915. He had been in poor health for several years. The funeral services were held at the home, burial being made in the city cemetery. [Date: 4/15/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 15, Page 5]

York, Mother of Prof. I. E.: On Dec. 15th the death angel visited the home of Prof. I. E. York and claimed for its victim his mother, who was eighty-four years old. [Date: 1/14/1915, Vol. XIII, No. 2, Page 1]