C. J.DavisCOLUMBUS JACKSON DAVIS
8 thTENNESSEE (DIBRELL'S) CAVALRY
CSA

PERSONAL INFORMATION

Born: 8 August 1840 in Jackson County, Tennessee
Died: 7 February 1917in Putnam County, Tennessee
Buried: West Graveyard, Putnam County, Tennessee
Parents: Henry and Susannah (Davis) West

Married: Almira Pendergrass on 29 March 1860 in Putnam County, Tennessee
Born: 12 February 1841 in White County, Tennessee
Died: 30 January 1920in Putnam County, Tennessee
Buried: West Graveyard, Putnam County, Tennessee
Parents: Jesse W. and Ann (Witt) Pendergrass

Children:

  1. Almeda Jane Davis
  2. George L. Davis
  3. Mary Alabama Davis
  4. Maniza Ann Davis
  5. Erastus Hickman Davis
  6. Dempse Martin Davis
  7. Lula Frances Davis
  8. Milus Travis Davis
  9. Henry Jesse Davis
  10. Lillie Pearl Davis

RELATIVES WHO SERVED

  • Nephew: Jacob Hickman Davis - 13th Tennessee (Gore's) Cavalry Regiment
  • Nephew: Henry Polk Davis - 25th Tennessee Infantry and 13th Tennessee (Gore's) Cavalry Regiment
  • Nephew: Henry Milton Davis - 25th Tennessee Infantry and 13th Tennessee (Gore's) Cavalry Regiment
  • Brother-in-Law: John T. Pendergrass - 8th Tennessee (Dibrell's) Cavalry

MILITARY INFORMATION

13 th(Gore's) Tennessee Cavalry
(also known as 8 thTennessee Cavalry)
Company C

ABSTRACT:

  • Entered the service as a Private and left the service as a 2nd Lieutenant
  • Enlisted 1 September 1862 at Cookeville
  • 30 June - 31 December 1864: Present
  • Appointed Lieutenant 1 September 1864

PENSION APPLICATION ABSTRACT

S8829

( Download Full Pension Application)

ABSTRACT:

  • Filed 2 March 1907
  • Accepted
  • Resident of Cookeville, TN
  • Member: Co. C 13th TN Cavalry
  • Born: in Jackson County in 1840
  • Enlisted in 1862 in Co. C 13 TN Cavalry, Captain J. G. Woolsey's Company. Col. G. G. Dibrell's Regiment
  • Battles: engaged in all battles of the company except for those after 31 December 1862. He was captured and sent to Camp Douglas, IL. Exchanged in April 1863.
  • Disease: Contracted small pox in prison
  • Married: Wife is 66 years old; Married for 29 years, Has 5 sons and 4 daughters
  • Occupation: He was Justice of the Peace until last August
  • Attest: J. H. Reagan and G. W. Judd

Supporting Documents:

  • C. J. Davis (10 Sep 1912) - Requests a pension

WIDOW'S PENSION APPLICATION ABSTRACT

W6680

( Download Full Pension Application)

ABSTRACT:

  • Filed 29 March 1917
  • Accepted
  • Died 4 October 1936
  • Resides RFD #2, Cookeville, Putnam County, TN
  • Resident of TN all her life
  • Maiden Name: Almira Pendergrass
  • Born on 12 February 1841 in White County
  • Her husband was Captain C. J. (Jackson) Davis who was born 8 Aug 1840 in Putnam County (then Jackson County).
  • They were married 29 March 1860 at her father's house by Esq. Sam McCaleb.
  • Her husband died 7 February 1917 at our home.
  • They had 5 sons and 5 daughters, nine of which are living.
  • Witness: J. H. Davis
    • Has been acquainted with her for 60 years.
    • She has resided in this and adjoining counties all her life. She has resided in Putnam County for 60 years.
    • She was born in White County in 1841.
    • Her husband was his uncle. He knew him intimately.
    • He was present at their marriage.

Supporting Documents:

  • Tennessee Board of Pension Examiners (16 Apr 1907) - Requests Service Records
  • War Department (19 Apr 1907) - Sent Service Records
  • Special Examiner (29 Mar 1917) - We have received your pension, and we need to see what portion of your father's property falls to you. If any considerable portion falls to you, it will make your property too valuable.
  • Frank Moses (29 Mar 1917) - We have received your pension, and we need to see what portion of your father's property falls to you. If any considerable portion falls to you, it will make your property too valuable.
  • Almira Davis (3 Apr 1917) - There must be some mistake as to my identity. My father was Jesse Pendergrass who died in October 1882. The amount of his estate that came to me was less than $35.

CENSUS DATA

  • 1850 Census: Jackson County, TN, Page 241
  • 1860 Census: Putnam County, TN, Page 12
  • 1870 Census: Putnam County, TN, Page 112
  • 1880 Census: Putnam County, TN, Page 80D
  • 1900 Census: Putnam County, TN, Page 3A
  • 1910 Census: Putnam County, TN, Page 5A

OBITUARY

Putnam County Herald
18 February 1917
Vol. XV, No. 6, Page 1

  • Captain C. J. Davis Dies - Capt. C. J. Davis died at his home about two miles from Cookeville Tuesday night, Feb. 6, 1917 after an illness of several weeks duration. He was about 76 years of age and one of the best known citizens of Putnam county. Capt. Davis was a lifelong member of the Presbyterian church, a Mason and Odd Fellow. He was a justice of the peace for many years and represented this county for two terms in the legislature. He is survived by his wife and children, Demps Davis, Mrs. D. P. Peek, Mrs. H. N. Ritchey and Mrs. Alph Judd all living in Texas; M. T. Davis of Mississippi, E. H. Davis, Jesse Davis, and Mrs. John Williams of Putnam county. Captain Davis was buried at the West Graveyard Thursday afternoon with Masonic Rites, the Odd Fellow Lodge participating.

 

The Nashville Tennessean
8 February 1917

Page 7

  • CAPT. JACKSON DAVIS DIES NEAR COOKEVILLE -- COOKEVILLE, Tenn., Feb. 7 -- (Special) -- Capt. Jackson Davis died last night at this home, two miles southwest of this city, after an illness of about one month, of an affection (sic) of the heart. He was 76 years old, but until a few weeks ago appeared to be in robust health, notwithstanding his advanced age. He was reared and spent his entire life in this county. He served gallantly thoughout the civil war in the Confederate army, begin promoted to the rank of captain at the close of the war. Ever since the organization of the Confederate Veterans' association of this state he has been prminently identified with it, and was at all times deeply int4erested in the welfare of the veterans of the lost cause. He always took a deep interest in the Pat Cleburned bivouac, United Confederate Veterans, of this city. For many years he had been a prominent Mason and Odd Fellow, and was always actibe in the work of these fraternities. For fifty years he had been a ruling elder of the Presbyterian church, and was always active in the affairs of the Cookeville presbytery. For twenty years he was a leading member of the county court. He represented Putnam county in the general assemblies of 1895 and 1913. He is survived by his widow, to he was married more than fifty years ago, and by eight grown children. His interment will take place tomorrow at the West cemetery. The funeral services will be conducted under the joint auspices of the Masons, Odd Fellows and Confederate Veterans.


The Confederate Veteran
Vol. XXV, Page
171

  • CAPT C. J. DAVIS - After an illness of several weeks, Capt. Columbus Jackson Davis died at his home, near Cookeville, Tenn., on February 17, 1917. He was seventy-six years old and had been a resident of Putnam County all his life, with the exception of the four years of service for the Confederacy. He was a man of splendid natural ability, a great student of history, a man of sound judgement and of the highest integrity and most charitable and unselfish nature, and he had always taken an active interest in public affairs. Although he had been lame from his childhood from an injury to his knee, in the fall of 1862 he enlisted as a private in Company C, 8th Tennessee Cavalry, Capt. I. G. Woolsey's company. In December he was captured in the fight at Parker's Crossroads and sent to Camp Chase Prison, where he was kept until his exchange, in June 1863. Immediately afterwards he rejoined his command and served under General Forrest until after the battle of Chickamauga. He was with Longstreet in all the fighting around Knoxville, was in the one hundred days' battle from Dalton to Atlanta, commanded the skirmish line at Saltville, Va., and was in all the engagements of this command from the day of his enlistment until the close of the war, except while he was in prison. Enlisting as a private, he was promoted step by step and had become captain of this company when the war closed. He was a man of distinguished and commanding appearance and a natural leader of men. Captain Davis served for many years as a member of the County Court of Putnam County and represented that county in the General Assemblies of 1895 and 1913. For about fifty years he had been a ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church and was no less zealous in the service of his Master than he had been in the service of his county. He loved the Southland with all the ardor of his being and was devoted to his State and the memory of its heroes and statesmen. He was one of the most active members of pat Cleburne Bivouac at Cookeville. The CONFEDERATE VETERAN had no stancher friend than he. From his young manhood he had been a devoted Mason; he was also a prominent Odd Fellow and was active in both of these orders. In 1860 Captain Davis was married to Miss Almira Pendergrass, of Putnam County, who survives him. for fifty-seven years they journeyed happily through life. Four daughters and five sons are also left to mourn the loss of this loving and devoted father. [Ernest H. Boyd, Cookeville, Tenn.]

Putnam County Herald
12 February 1920
Vol. XVIII, No. 1, Page 5

  • Mrs. Almira Davis - Again the death angel has come to our community and claimed for its own our dearly beloved sister. Almira Pendergrass was born February 12, 1841 and died January 30, 1920 age 78 years 11 months and 18 days. She was married to C. J. Davis on March 29, 1860. To the union was born ten children, nine of whom are still living, Lillie Pearl having died infancy. Those surviving are: Mrs. H. N. Ritchey of Hale Center, Texas, Demps Davis of Boving, Texas, Travis Davis of Grenada, Mississippi; George Davis and Mrs. Peyton Peek and Mrs. Alpheus Judd of Lubbock, Texas; Mrs. John Williams of Algood; Jesse and Erastus Davis of Cookeville. Mrs. Davis leaves 54 grandchildren, 37 great-grandchildren and one brother who is now 86 years old. Sister Davis professed hope in Christ at an early age. She joined the church and lived a faithful member until her death. There is none who labored more faithfully and earnestly than she. She bore her afflicatoins patiently and always net every duty with a smile. The home is made lonely be her absence. A place is vacaant that can never be filled. But we shold not grieve for we earnestly believe that she is resting peacefully in the arms of Jesus. Though we cannot hear her sweet voice or feel the touch of her gently hand, we know she is happy with God and his holy angels. She always had a kind word for everyone. She was a great neighbor and loving mother, indeed. She will be sadly missed by her children, especially the one who so faithfully cared for her these past three years. Cheer up sad hearts; mother cannot come back to you but you can go to her if you will only follow the example that she has left for you. She paid the debt that we all soon must pay. Oh not in cruelty nor in wrath, the reaper came that day. It was an angel that visited the home and took our dear mother away. Lonely is the path and sad the home, Since thy sweet face is gone, But Oh a brighter than ours in Heaver is now thine home. Rev. W. B. Gentry.

ADDITIONAL DATA

  • Death Certificate: Putnam County, TN (1917) - #378 - Columbus Jackson Davis
  • Death Certificate: Putnam County, TN (1920) - #313 - Mrs. Almira Davis
  • Pendergrass Family Bible Records, Cookeville, TN
  • Putnam County Herald, 7 April 1910, Page 1
    Golden Wedding
    Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Davis celebrated their golden wedding on March 29, 1910. Fifty years of happy wedded life is a blessing vouchsafed to comparatively few, and the Herald congratulates Capt. and Mrs. Davis upon their having reached the half-century mark together, and wishes them continued health and many returns of their wedding anniversary.
    It is certainly a pleasure to chronicle a golden wedding. Every golden wedding anniversary bears witness to the faithful love of one man and one woman, who have stood together loyally for fifty years in the sacred companionship of husband and wife. Every golden wedding anniversary is a protest against the unrest and infidelity of modern life.
    On March 29, 1860, Mr. C. J. Davis and Miss Myra Pendergrass were married. They are both natives of this vicinity, and have always lived here. They have nine children - five sons and four daughter, who are all living.
    Mr. and Mrs. Davis are genuine southerners and whole-souled christians, whose home is always one of hospitality, and their friends are innumerable.
  • Putnam County Herald, 27 October 1910, Vol. VIII, No. 43, Page 1
    C. J. Davis Chosen - The Putnam county Democrats meet in mass convention last Saturday afternoon to name a candidate for representative and after a brief session unanimously nominated Hon. C. J. Davis. Mr. Davis is too well known in the county to need any introduction at our hands. He was a gallant Confederate soldier in Dibrell's famous brigade, and since the war has been one of our best and most public spirited citizens. He served one term in the legislature, in 1895, and will be a valuable member of that body next winter. From all the information we have, there is no doubt but Mr. Davis will be elected.
  • Putnam County Herald, 2 April 1914, Page 4
    CAPT. JACKSON DAVIS
    Putnam County's Representative to the State Legislature - Is an Ex-Confederate Soldier and Good Citizen
    Mr. Columbus Jackson Davis was born in Putnam county in 1840, and was named in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson by his father, Henry Davis, who fought under "Old Hickory" in the battle of New Orleans in 1815. Henry Davis was born in Virginian 1794, and his parents moved to Tennessee when he was quite young. He lived the life of a farmer, and died in 1866. Capt. Davis' mother was nee Miss Susanna West, whose parent moved from North Carolina to Overton county, this state, when she was yet in her girlhood, and she died in 1885 at the age of eighty-seven years. She had a sister that lived and died in Todd county, Kentucky, at the age of ninety-five years, and a brother, Stephen West, who died in Pickett county in 1905 at the age of ninety-six.
    Capt. Davis was married in 1860 to Miss Elmira Pendergrass, and nine of their children are married and properous in life. The youngest of their ten children died in infancy. Capt. Davis has been an Odd Fellow for eighteen years, a Mason for forty-four years, and an Elder in the Presbyterian church since 2868. He was eighteen years justice of the peace, and was elected to the state legislature in 1894 and 1812 (sic) - being Putnam county's Representative at this writing. In the Civil War he was Captain of Co. C, Eighth Tennessee Cavalry.
  • Putnam County Herald, 27 August 1914, Vol. XII, No. 34, Page 3
    Honorable C. J. Davis has nearly recovered from the effect of a large carbuncle on the back of his neck that for a time assumed a dangerous condition.
  • Putnam County Herald, 14 February 1915, Vol. XIII, No. 5:
    CAPT. JACKSON DAVIS
    Putnam County's Representative to the State Legislature -- Is an Ex-Confederate Soldier and Good Citizen
    Mr. Columbus Jackson Davis was born in Putnam county in 1840, and was named in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson by his father, Henry Davis, who fought under "Old Hickory" in the battle of New Orleans in 1815. Henry Davis was born in Virginia in 1794, and his parents moved to Tennessee when he was quite young. He lived the life of a farmer, and died in 1866. Capt. Davis' mother was nee Miss Susannah West, whose parents moved from North Carolina to Overton county, this state, when she was yet in her girlhood, and she died in 1885 at the age of eighty seven years. She had a sister that lived and died in Todd county, Kentucky, at the age of ninety-five years, and a brother, Stephen West, who died in Pickett county in 1905 at the age of ninety-six.
    Capt. Davis was married in 1860 to Miss Elmira Pendergrass, and nine of their children are married and prosperous in life. The youngest off their ten children died in infancy. Capt. Davis has been an Odd Fellow for eighteen years, a Mason for forty-four years, and an Elder in the Presbyterian church since 1868. He was eighteen years justice of the peace, and was elected to the state legislature in 1894 and 1812 (sic - 1912) being Putnam county's Representative at this writing. In the Civil War he was Captain of Co. C, Eighth Tennessee Cavalry.
  • Putnam County Herald, 27 October 1910, Vol. VIII, No. 43, Page 1
    C. J. Davis Chosen - The Putnam county Democrats meet in mass convention last Saturday afternoon to name a candidate for representative and afer a brief session unanimously nominated Hon. C. J. Davis. Mrs. is too well known in the county to need any introduction at our hands. He was a gallant Confederate soldier in Dibrell's famous brigade, and since the war has been one of our best and most public spirited citizens. He served one term in the legislature, in 1895, and will be a valuable member of that body next winter. From all the information we have, there is no doubt but Mr. Davis will be elected.
  • Putnam County Herald, 28 October 1937, Page 4
    DAVIS FAMILY REUNION HELD HERE SUNDAY
    One among the earlist and sturdiest pioneers to locate in this section was Henry Davis. His farm was about four miles southwest of Cookeville, and is now known as the Fred White farm. He reared a large and highly respected family of fourteen children. He was the great-grandfather of Mayor Ezra Davis, Judge B. C. Huddleston, Will C. Davis and many other residents of this city and county. He was the grandfather of W. M. (Morgan) Davis and Esq. H. J. Davis. Three sons of Henry Davis, Sr., all whom owned farms and reared their families near Cookeville and in the same community in which their father located, were outstanding men in the early history of Putnam county. They were the Rev. Stephen Davis, a widely known pioneer Cumberland Presbyterian minister who served as trustee of this county; Capt. C. J. (Jackson) Davis, one of the most highly esteemed citizens of this county in his lifetime. He was a Confederate solider, for many years a leading member of the county court, an active and devoted elder in the Presbyterian church, and twice represented Putnam county in the general assembly. The other of these three prominent pioneer brothers was William Davis, a man of great strength of character, a devoted elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and a leader in the old Lees Seminary church. His farm, now owned by Joe Cronk, is generally known as the Davis farm. William Davis was the father of a large family of children, among them being Henry P. Davis, for many years one of the most prominent citizens of Cookeville, a Confederate soldier, a lawyer, a former county court clerk of this county and representative in the genreal assembly. He was a resident of Cookeville from his young manhood until his death in 1903. He reared a large family, among his children being Will C. Davis, well known Cookeville business man, and Mrs. R. P. Morgan, of this city. Newton Davis, a son of William Davis, was a highly esteemed young business man of Cookeville until his death many years ago. Mrs. William Huddleston, mother of couonty Judge B. C. Huddleston, was a daughter of William Davis. Stephen Davis and other sons of William Davis emigrated to Texas in their young manhood where resided until their deaths. John B. Davis, a son of William Davis, continued to reside at the old homestead until his dath in old age, which occurred several years ago. Only oneof the children of William Davis is now living -- this sole survivor of her father's large family being Mrs. Mary Jane Carr, now 86 years old, widow of the late Leroy Carr. On last Sunday a reunion of descendants of the three noted pioneer brothers -- the Rev. Stephen Davis, Capt. C. J. Davis and William Davis -- was held at the Cumberland Presbyterian church in this city. It was a largely attended and most enjoyable affair. The Texas branch of the Davis clan have, for several years, met in an annual family reunion, and on this happy family reunion, and on this happy family occasion a number of these Texas relatives were present as guests of honor or their Tennessee kinspeople -- they were Dillard Davis, Mrs. Stella Davis Caldwell, Mrs. Dora Davis Donnell, Mrs. Maggie Davis Gibson and Mrs. Lila Carr Carroll, of Breckenridge and Eliasville, Texas, and Oklahoma City, Okla. All of these out-of-the state relatives are descendants of Stephen Davis, except Mrs. Maggie Gibson, who ia a grand-daughter of Capt. C. J. Davis. After attending the morning preaching service the large Davis family assembled in the commodious dining hall of the church were the long tables were loaded with everything good to eat. Judge B. C. Huddleston acted as toatmaster (sic) and made a feeling and appropriate talk which was responded toby Mr. Dillard Davis, of Texas, and all of the other Texas and Oklahoma kinspeople. Judge E. H. Boyd, Rev. Hugh Goodpasture and Homer Reeves, as guests and friends of the family, also made talks, paying tribute to the Davis family and the find contribution which it has made ever since pioneer days, to the religious, fraternal, business and civic life of Cookeville and Putnam county.
  • Biographical Directory of the Tennessee General Assembly, Vol. III, Page 222
    HOUSE, 49th and 58th General Assemblies, 1895-97, 1913-15, representing Putnam County; Democrat. Born in Putnam, then a part of Jackson County, on August 8, 1840; son of Henry Jackson and Susanna (West) Davis. Extent of schooling not determined. Married in Putnam County on March 29, 1860, to Almire Pendergrass, native of White County, daughter of Jesse Pendergrass; five sons and fie daughters -- Mrs. D. Peyton Peek, Demps, Mrs. H. N. Richay, Mrs. Alf. Judd, M. Travis, E. H., Jesse, Mrs. John Williams, George, and one daughter whose name is not indicated. Engaged in farming near Cookeville, Putnam County. Justice of the peace for unspecified number of years ending in August, 1906. In Confederate army; enlisted at Cookeville on September 1, 1862, as private, Company C, 13th Tennessee Cavalry, often referred to as 8th Tennessee Cavalry; appointed 2nd lieutenant same day; later commanded company with rank of captain; captured December 31, 1862, and sent as prisoner of war to Camp Douglas, Illinois; exchanged i April 1863; in all battles that command was engaged in, except for time a prisoner of war; paroled at Washington, Georgia, May 9, 1865, in command of company at time. Ruling elder in Presbyterian Church; member Free and Accepted Masons; Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Died at home in Cookeville on February 7, 1917; buried in West Cemetery. Uncle of Henry Polk Davis sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

C. J. Davis

Jackson Davis

 

 

Top Photo Source: Tennessee General Assembly 1870 Present
1913-1914 58th General Assembly Composite Photo

Second Photo Source: Tennessee General Assembly 1870 Present
1895-1896 49th General Assembly Composite Photo

Bottom Photo Source: Stray leaves from Putnam County history : pioneer families, sights and sounds from the past, old school groups, Civil War soldiers, Page 233